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Two Ways to Completely Withdraw from Class(es)
A student may completely withdraw by:

1. Successively withdrawing from class(es) until the student is no longer registered for any class for the term, or

2. Withdrawing from all class(es) at one time so the student is no longer registered for any class(es) for the term.

The Withdrawal Process

A student whose intent it is to withdraw from one or more classes can do so by withdrawing on the web or in person. See the following for more detail in each of these methods.

Withdrawing on the Web

Students who withdraw on the web need to be aware that some instructors do not permit web withdrawals. Students should refer to the instructor’s class syllabus to determine if a web withdrawal is permitted by the instructor of the class from which they are withdrawing.

Once the web withdrawal is submitted, both the student and the instructor will receive an e-mail notification of the withdrawal. At the time of the withdrawal, students are assigned a grade of “W”.

Withdrawing in Person

A student may withdraw in person by presenting a properly signed and completed “Registration Change Form” to the Office of the Registrar. At the time of the signing of the “Registration Change Form” the Registrar will also assign the student a grade of “W”.

For more information on specific dates see the section below entitled, “Important Dates in the Withdrawal Process”.

Actions which are not considered an official notification of withdrawal include:

Assuming classes will be cancelled for non-payment,
Never starting a class(es) without proper notification,
Ceasing to attend class(es) without proper notification,

Giving written or verbal notice to anyone other than an Office of the Registrar employee, or campus student services designee,

Stopping payment on a check used to pay tuition and/or fees, and

Crossing out class(es) on the schedule or bill and making partial payment based on that action.

The effective date of a withdrawal

In order to meet internal and federal requirements, it is important for the institution to determine a specific date that the student withdrew from the school. The institution will use the earliest of the following dates in its determination:

The date of the student’s verbal or written notification to the Office of the Registrar or campus student services designee of their intent to withdraw,
The date of the student’s complete web withdrawal, or
The date the student has ceased to participate in all classes; however, it must be noted that ceasing attendance in a term cannot be accepted by the institution as official notification of the student’s intent to withdraw. If it is determined that the last day of participation in the term is earlier than the date of the student’s withdrawal, then for federal purposes, that last day of participation must be considered as the withdrawal date in calculating the student’s earned aid.

NOTE: Students are always encouraged to check with their advisors and/or instructors prior to withdrawing from classes so they are fully informed of any academic impact the withdrawal might have on them.

The Impact of Dropping and/or Withdrawing and Federal Aid

Federal funds are awarded to the student anticipating that the student will complete the class(es) for which he or she has registered in a given term. When a student does not complete the class(es), it is necessary for the institution to review the aid the student received based on the classes from which the student has dropped or withdrawn. Students who completely withdraw from classes for any term are subject to the Return of Title IV (R2T4) refund calculation as dictated by federal regulations.

Prior to withdrawing from one or more classes, the student is encouraged to review the Return of Title IV (R2T4) information provided by the Office of Financial Aid.

Partial Withdrawal of Classes and Federal Aid

Withdrawal of some, but not all the classes may affect your federal loan(s) if this partial withdrawal occurs within the Drop/Add Period. A student who takes 12 hours or more is considered a full time student. If your withdrawal causes you to drop below 12 credit hours the following statuses apply:

9 thru 11 credit hours is considered three-quarters-time,
6 thru 8 credit hours is considered half-time, and
1 thru 5 credit hours is considered less-than-half-time.

Complete Withdrawal of Classes and Federal Aid

Withdrawal from all classes requires the institution to recalculate the student’s aid. The process for recalculating the aid is referred to as a Return to Title IV or R2T4. Regardless of when you withdraw from the classes, this calculation is required. The calculation is designed to allow the student to keep the aid he or she has earned as a result of attending and participating in the classes. Once it is determined how much aid the student earned, the rest of the student’s aid must be returned to the federal government. The student should be aware that this process:

Requires the institution to notify the lender that the student is no longer enrolled in the institution, which will subject the student to accelerated repayment responsibilities,

May leave the student with a debit balance due on the student’s account that must be paid before registering for the following term, and

Will result in the cancellation of future student loans that have been awarded for later academic terms.

Example: Bobby Greene withdrew from all of his classes 24 days into the spring term. The Return to Title IV (R2T40 calculation determined that Bobby earned 31.6% of his aid (24 days attended ÷ 76 instructional days in the term). On behalf of Bobby, the institution had to return
$1,439 of his federal aid. The result was that Bobby ended up owing the institution that amount of money. A service block was put on his account, late fees accrued, and when his bill was not paid on time, all of his classes for the following term were dropped. Bobby now owes the institution and cannot continue his education at the institution until his bill is paid in full.

Modules and Federal Aid; Partial or Complete

Withdrawing from modules can be a partial or a complete withdrawal. Modules are any flex-class, flex-term, mini-term, mini-session where a class or classes in a program do not span the entire length of the institution’s payment period used in disbursing federal grants and loans, or in other words, do not stretch from the first day of the term to the last day of the term.

Specifically, this is referring to the institution’s J-Term(s) and summer sessions. Though typically many of those modules are only offered in the summer, J-Term modules are offered at the beginning of the spring term often to distance learning students.

On October 29th, 2010, the Department of Education published Final Regulations on Program Integrity. These final regulations made some significant changes to the Title IV regulations. Tile IV funds affected by these regulations are Federal Pell Grants, FSEOG, assorted other grants and federal loans, i.e., Perkins and Stafford Loans.

One of the new regulations that will significantly change the way the institution has done things in the past is referred to as R2T4 and Modules, which references the Return of Title IV (R2T4) Funds when the student withdraws from a modular term. This new regulation which was effective July 1, 2011 basically states that a student is considered withdrawn when the student has not completed all the days he or she was scheduled to attend in the payment period.

To determine if the student is a withdrawal or not the government has given us three questions to ask and answer. They are:

1. Did the student withdraw from a class, or not attend a class he or she had enrolled to take? If answered “no” this is not a withdrawal; however, if answered “yes” go to question 2.

2. Is the student currently attending or active in another class? If answered “yes” this is not a withdrawal; however, if answered “no” go to question 3.
3. Did the student confirm intent to attend a future class during the same term?

Question 3 from the above set deserves its own explanation. The new regulation also states that the institution is not required to treat a student who ceases to attend a modular class as a withdrawal if the student gives the institution written confirmation of his or her intent to attend a later modular class in the term. The institution’s web registration/withdrawal system is designed to record this written consent from the student.

Example: In a summer term, Bobby Greene enrolls in one 3 hour class in each summer session.
Bobby completes the first session, but two days into the second session, he withdraws from it.
To determine if this is a withdrawal, apply the 3 questions to it.

1. Did the student withdraw from a class? The answer is “yes”, as the student dropped the second session class. Go to question 2.
2. Is the student currently attending or active in another class? The answer is “no” as he only had 1 class during the second session and once he withdrew from it he was not currently attending or active in any class. Go to question 3.

3. Did the student confirm intent to attend a future class during the same term? The answer is not known, but the student would have given the institution the answer to the question during the web withdrawal. Assuming Bobby indicated that he was not going to take the third session, this would be a withdrawal, and Bobby’s aid would have to be recalculated based on the actual days he attended.

Had Bobby indicated it was his intent to take the third session, and later chose not to attend it, his aid would be adjusted based on the date that he dropped the second session.

Example: In a fall term, Bobby Greene enrolls in one 3 hour full term (parent-term) class and two distance learning modular class that each run back-to-back through ½ the term each. Bobby completes the first modular class, but drops the second modular class before it starts. To determine if this is a withdrawal, apply the 3 questions to it.

1. Did the student withdraw, or not attend a class? The answer is “yes” as Bobby did not start the second modular class.

2. Is the student currently attending or active in another class? The answer is “yes” as bobby is still enrolled in the parent-term class; therefore, this is not a withdrawal. There is no need to answer question 3.

Example: In a fall term, Bobby Bearcat enrolls in three modular classes. Two of the classes run the first half of the parent-term and the third class runs the last half of the parent-term. Bobby completes the first two classes receiving passing grades in both, but does not attend the third class or second half of the parent-term. To determine if this is a withdrawal, apply the 3 questions to it.

1. Did the student withdraw, or not attend a class? The answer is “yes” as Bobby did not attend the third class for which he had registered.

2. Is the student currently attending or active in another class? The answer is “no.” The classes Bobby took at the first of the term are over. He is no longer attending or active in a class.

3. Did Bobby confirm his intent to attend a future class during the same term? The answer is “no” as there are no more future terms to take a class. This is a withdrawal.

Prior to 7/1/2011 neither the above first or third example would have been withdrawals. This new regulation makes it more important than ever for students to take only the classes they need and to finish those classes.

Not participating in classes and its Effect on Federal Aid

Withdrawals are not the only thing that can negatively impact a student’s aid. Students who are determined by their instructor to have not participated in a class may receive an X or WX grade. When a student receives either an X or WX grade the institution is required to adjust the student’s aid as though the student never registered for that class or those classes. This adjustment is made regardless of whether the student has previously withdrawn. A student receiving X or WX grades in all their classes will have all their aid returned to the federal government.
In some more complex situations, usually at the end of a term when grades are posted, when a student has previously withdrawn and a R2T4 calculation has been completed the institution is required to adjust the student’s aid based on any reported X or WX grade and recalculate the R2T4 based on the adjusted amounts.

Note: A student challenging an X or WX grade has 45 days after the end of the term to resolve that grade to be eligible to have their aid restored.

Avoiding or Minimizing Reduced or Returned Aid

The best way for a student to avoid losing part of all his or her aid is to enroll for only the classes they intend to take and complete those classes. The following are some additional suggestions:

Before the term begins:

Review the class schedule to be sure the registration is for the right class.
Make all class changes (drops/adds).

After the term has begun:

Review the withdrawal policies and procedures to fully understand the consequences of withdrawing from a class.
Check with the instructor(s) or adviser for alternatives to dropping a class.

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